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? it's going to be a bumpy road. welcome, everybody. i am neil cavuto. unions are vowing that it is a right to work state. they are promising the law for public workers to have the option of joining a union. unions insist this doesn't give the governor a free pass to from the recall election. some are planning that in michigan. do you remember what scott walker winter in wisconsin? unions emboldened by the election, they can rightly say that they helped carry barack obama over the finish line. sometimes violently, right to work is wrong. even though they released video like this. don't think that they are not trying to do the same in other states like new jersey and new york. hold on folks, i really suspect that is the just getting started. they are not seeing this labor crunch. how big and bad business debt? we have rick ungar and dd binky. it really doesn't matter. they could still flex their muscles. what is happening? >> i think you are going to start seeing it now. he's unions are fighting for their life right here. you have about a 37% of private attacks. you are yo
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of the history of the relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the first sent the troops into the soviet union as part of a broad counterrevolutionary force led by the british and then the united states refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer se
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. i think that's important a factor in that if you look at the broad history of the united states relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the united states first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states to refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise mat
's cliff. that's not the only outrage coming from the unions this week. we are going to discuss that next. free market capitalism, best path to prosperity. this is something they learned the hard day the american people are tired of the status quo. >> who are you going to vote for? >> definitely not this guy. >> you know your money got him elected last time. >> i didn't give that guy a dime. >> yeah, you did. our union gave him a big chunk of your dues money. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. breaking news now from the asian markets. japan's nikkei rising to
the republicans are trying to jam through right to work laws. and 12,000 unionized workers showed up to protest. they reached capacity in the capitol building at 2,200. they shut out everybody else abc news report. >> michigan republican controlled state legislature approved the controversial right to work bill today 58-51. >> the bill is passed. >> why shut people out? why did we do this? i can tell you why because good ideas get debated and bad ones get rammed through with police protection in a lame duck legislature. [ crowd chants ] >> well, governor snyder had run his one tough nerd and hence that's buy they're chanting one term nerd. they are very mad at him for flip-flopping. we'll get to that in a second. then, they got really mad at steven crowder a fox contributor and so-called comedian. he got in workers' faces and it didn't work out we will for everybody involved. >> leave it alone. >> get out of my face! get the [bleep] out of my face. i didn't hurt nobody. get out of my face! back off! back the [bleep] off! >> ok! >> he's got a gun! >> i'll kill the [bleep] with a gun! kind of kil
union under stalin's leadership. we think that's important to factor in but if you look at the broad sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, w
the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release
, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. proposed each country allow the other country's reconnaissance plane to fly overhead to detect preparations for a sneak attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed to like the
in his state of the union? >> certainly a priority if the president wants to advance it. he has the biggest bully pulpit in the country. the president can convince half the country or more that he's right, but to stop anything from happening, the nra does not have to convince half the country. it has to mobilize its members in key districts and it's not artificially freezing anything, it's politically freezing something by mobilizing your people who they have who are single-issue voters who care a lot about this and agree with their executives and kind of officers about how -- about what is sensible and wrong in stopping gun violence. >> one argument is that mobilization, though, to your point, is very asimilymmetric. research in this area shows that you have right up in the shooting you have a spike of discussions of gun control. this was true after the assassination attempt of congresswoman giffords and after aurora, then in the following weeks, the discussion of the policy fades. and one of the political scientists involved in this calls it, of course, the issue attention cyc
, and it is supplied by the soviet union, it's intended to be delivered principally by soviet-style scud rockets. and, essentially, when you fire explode over the target, they set up a cloud, if you will, of deadly gas. and in the middle east iraq has used it twice, once against their own people and once against the iranians, and so there's a precedent, if you will, jon, for the use of deadly nerve agent in the middle east. the downside for the syrians, of course, is that the worst place to use nerve agent, if that's the proper term, is in the middle east because it dissipates easily, very difficult in desert terrain for it to last very long, but it's a deadly and potent weapon. and i know the administration is concerned about in their last moments the syrians using this thing as sort of a revenge weapon. jon: yeah. well, sometimes weapons systems, as you know, are constructed for deterrence. is it possible he's just trying to scare some people here, or does he really spend to use these things? >> yeah, i absolutely agree with that. i think he had a bad moment when it looked like the gates were closi
that, you know, easy for the other guys to do. i understand that. but the problem in the european union is that there is only one dimension of union, and that is monetary union as opposed to fiscal union. and i think what's happened in greece, in spain, is that they benefited from low interest rates because of their reunion, and that meant that they allowed their fiscal policies to get out of line. so it's sort of just the reverse of the problem that we had here that we have here, which was okay, we can raise rates and cut them back. here, rates came down. so the discipline that would naturally occur disappeared when you have a union. >> i thought you at a different point. greece and spain and so forth, could borrow at german interest rates and they went kind of wild. the good old united states of america, we rent historically big deficits. we consumed without settling them. how is this all possible? because the chinese were happily loaning us money at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a -- rather pessimistic about that. but i see a rather tarnished silver lining and because i think if that happens, then the major powers will step in and actually try to undo proliferation. i'm not sure that would be a very happy world because i think that it would be strong pressures for the big five. the fi
union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." stay with cnn for continuing coverage of the fiscal cliff negotiations. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> the great french writer albert camel said life is a sum of all your choices. we're all defined by the choices we make every day, we make hundreds of them. paper or plastic, chicken or fish, most are mundane and require little thought, but others are agonizing, often life altering and then there are the decisions made by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history for better and some for worse. july 1776, the founding fathers decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage, about co
a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the leadership of no nation would ever, ever bargain initiate an action that assured their own destruction? >> well, one thing about the iranian leaders that they have in common with the leaders of terrorist groups like bin laden, they are not strapping on the suicide bombs, they are very willing to see young people and handicapped people and so on strap these things on, but their lives mean a lot to them, and that is something in our hip pocket it seems to me. they want to stay alive and they want to stay in power. >> rose: i want to talk about that. one quick question about what you believe with respect to iran. you believe that an attack by rael will be a terrible thing to happen, because it would only delay the inevi
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tells us retail numbers weren't good. >> reporter: i'm at union square which is mobbed. it's swinging. i spent the day here and it didn't get active until a couple of hours ago and as i look around, i don't see a lot of people with bags. i'm not sure they're shopping. but the retailers really hope they will because because they are in a lot of hurt. susan wanted to buy toys for her grandchildren but couldn't manage to go to a toy store. visions of the sandy hook elementary school massacre were in her head. >> i couldn't take the shopping and seeing all the little kids 5-year-olds, 6-year-olds, particularly saddens me. >> reporter: she bought gift cards instead and none of the extra stuff she might have been found being in stores. december retail is a bummer in the news and stores. >> this is not at all a good holiday season for the retailer. >> reporter: it could have been for the customer. >> 495. our price is 179 and an additional 10% now. >> reporter: and no one is buying it? >> not yet. >> reporter: this shop slashed prices as retailers did all over the country. still, it was not a g
. she after the state of the union speech that takes place next month. >> kelly: i know emanuel cleaver chairman. black caucus said she would be missed because of the contributions she made to the africa-american community. how does that wash with the resignation. >> i don't think that is any part of it whatsoever. >> kelly: okay. >> she is sayingly she is leaving to spend more time with family and has been there four years. not that she's had enough. but want to pursue other interest. >> kelly: thank you for joining us and we'll get into the e-mails. see you on the business network. that is an old picture by the way. >> kelly: coming up . what we saw from iran and egent 2012 could be nothing as what could be unfolding in 2013. >> julia: check this out. this guy was paralyze not supposed to walk again. your first look at new technology. dr. seigel is in to tell us about a medical miracle. ♪ ♪ it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind a
union and worked at the fairmont hotel, and also at the st. francis hotel and ended her career at the bakery. she is preceded in death by her husband who served three years in the coast guard and 30 in the navy. fay will be missed by her two sisters in michigan plus many her neez live niece lives in -- memorial services were held on november 17. ms. bingham will be greatly missed. thank you to debby, from human services network for alerting us to the passing of ms. bingham. also i have a couple of other wanted to say that coming up on the imperative agenda is a resolution in support of small business saturday which is the saturday two days after thanksgiving. and the resolution -- the imperative agenda resolution declares november 24, 2012 the citizen after thanksgiving holiday as small business holiday to celebrate increasing awareness of locally owned small business in san francisco. small businesses have less than 100 employees represent 98% of employ approximately 50% of employees in the private sector. small businesses also contribute to 52% of the total sales of taxes pai
, which i won't refer to as right to work legislation, it's more appropriately named crush the union legislation. i came up last night to the floor to speak on that issue, and as i am prone to do, i use a lot of analogies. so last night i used an analogy that some find offensive, and i certainly was not meaning to be offensive or use a derogatory term. you know, everybody knows what the n word is. . the n word, mr. speaker, is used to describe a group of people and the n word used to be fashionable or it used to be socially acceptable to use the n word, but now we don't say the n word, we say -- we refer to that word as the n word. i had never heard of the m word, representative schakowsky, the m word. it's a word also that describes a group of people and it at one time has been commonly used as a desipive -- descripive term. it was at one time socially -- scripive term. it was at one time socially acceptable. but to my discovery, just within the last 12 hours or so, i have found that the use of the -- the use of the m word is no longer socially acceptable. now, the m word he refers
to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i don't worry about the outrage fading. i worry about our collective courage to break through. and again, for me and for so many people in this country, this is not a new issue. we've been fighting this issue for a long, long time. i, in chicago we buried a child killed by gun violence every two weeks. think about that, every two weeks we bury a child. the vast majority innocent children. one at their birthday parties, in the afternoon. these aren't-- the vast ma jorbted aren't gangbangers. >> ifill: but outside of that neighborhood, it goes unremarked upon, mostly. >> that is what i worry about, is the lack of courage, the lack of willingness to break through. we have an endemic here, and we need to change that in a very fundamental way. and as i said for the horror and the anguish and the pain, i do think the world has shifted. i think people have a sense that enough is enough. and when you have, you know, 20 babies and six t
. it's a real sport. no, its not. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >>> gridlock in washington may seem like business as usual today but it hasn't always been that way. throughout the 1960's and '70s during one of the most turn you leapt periods in american history bipartisan senates drove sweeping reform to civil rights and social programs while challenging the executive branch over the vietnam war and ultimately moving to impeach president nixon over the watergate scandal. our next guest ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate:courage and statesmanship in tames of crisis." welcome to the program. >> nice to be here. >> why do you call it the last great senate? >> well, because from the early 'sick through about 1980 we had a senate that was in the forefront of everything that was going on in the country, and accomplished a great deal. the senate of humphrey, muskee, baker, ted kennedy, many other great americans. and we haven't had a senate like that for the last 30 years. i don't mean it's the last great senate we'll ever have, but we
's a man who basically believes in the european unionization of the united states. if you believe in that as obama does, too, this makes perfect sense. >> i've got the cd of yours. do you really sing on this. >> i sing on that with a full orchestra. you sing the devil went down to georgia. people said you killed the whole right wing pundit music business with your rendition. i felt i had to do something to address it. >> running on egg nothing? you wrote that? >> i wrote that. running objec on egg nog. >> there's nothing more gross in the world than egg nog. >> and you call yourself a great american? how can you be a great american if you hate egg nog? >> full of cholesterol. the government should ban it. >> all right. coming up, wait until you see this. the california teachers union took class aware far warfare toe new level,ary 8, narrated by ed. don't strain too hard. that silence you hear from the left when it comes to the struggle for freedom by egyptians, predictable. at a herpredictable at a at adir square filled to the rim. square filled to the rim. why are they so [ male
faced down the soviet union and had 500,000 combat troops in the field? the sequester isn't stepping off a cliff. it is taking one step back from the cliff. now, the tax increases, however, are a very different matter. without intervention, the federal tax burden will balloon 1% at the stroke of -- 21% at the stroke of midnight on new year's eve, taking $2,000 to $3,000 from an averaged family. the house passed legislation to protect our nation from such a calamity but mr. obama vowed to veto it and the senate killed it. . instead mr. he obama tells us he'll veto any plan that stops taxes going up on all those very wealthy folks making over $200,000, who he says need to pay their fair share. i suppose fairness is in the eyes of the beholder. the top 1% earned 17% of all income but pays 37% of all income taxes. but that's beside the point. the fine point of it is that a lot of these very wealthy folks making over $200,000 aren't very wealthy, and they aren't even folks. they are 1.3 million struggling small businesses filing under subchapter s. our small businesses produce 2/3 of the new
averted for now after mediators got the long shoreman's union to postpone it for month to work out time detail osafter new contract. correspondent phil keeting is following that story from miami. >> at least one end of the year cliff has been averted for now. container cliff. there will be no east and gulf coast port strike happening this weekend. but both sides still have much to work out. if they don't, five weeks from now will be right back to a sweeping strike with great consequences. >> a strike in long beach in los angeles a few weeks ago. that was close. if you cost that area, $1 billion a day. >> sticking point has been the container royalties. salary supplements for long shoremen. heavier the container, the more they get paid. the owners want to cap the royalties at last year's levels to 15,000 long shoreman did not. this from the federal mediator in washington. "the container royalty payment issue has been agreed upon in principle by the parties subject to achieving an overall collective bargaining agreement. this allege saves americans from higher prices for many consumer goo
. another san francisco hero, organizer of the prostitutes union. she had good friends and clients among pacific cisco police force. one tip dropped one night to the thought that charlie gaines would be killed that night i cops and he was out speaking somewhere and she wanted him to get home as quickly as she could. this is a kind of violent tensions brewing within the city over reform. because he wanted to open up the police force to minorities. it was a very white department in those days and they were fighting it to the nail into gay and two women. so we owe mayor moscone a great day. he was assigned to san francisco, had been a basketball star at saint ignatius and he was seen as a traitor by many of the kids he grew up with, it became part of the power structure in this town. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, i want to say one thing. it's very illustrated with the chapter i read about critters commune because that gentleman, was a vietnam veteran. he came to the haight and was embraced here. he was obviously on the brink of a breakdown or worse. he does not spat on. he was not reject
is propose this legislation through the taft harley act, anti-union, anti-labor act. that was his first legislation. he supports a federal aid to education. he supports a number of liberal issues. there are more conservative -- conservative issues he has voted for. does that answer your question? [laughter] >> if you look at his total record, i can go on forever. it is scattered throughout the book. the obama chapter -- everybody said obama grew and changed. no he did not. >> any other questions? thank you president so much for joining us. -- both so much for joining us. [applause] >> >>, south carolina governor and the key kelly announcing her replacement for senator jim demint's speech, followed by the senator's speech on the floor. and then a senator kay bailey hutchinson delivers her farewell address. tomorrow on "washington journal," will talk about the fiscal cliff with stand colander and joshua gordon. by the authorsed of the new e book from politico, glen fresh and jonathan martin. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> as president obama begins hi
held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use abatomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine the process of making a tough decision. we'll hear about major decisions on an international stage. about corporate decisions to personal ones. from taking down the most wanted man in the world. >> the president said i'm going to go with my decision. write up the orders .. >> to giving up a dream career. >> it was a sense of lm unreality, i'm not really sure i know who i am. >> to uprooting a company culture. >> some people actually quit. >> to opening the door to a closed society. >> this is like a spy thriller. >> each of my guests have wrestled with a difficult choice. they'll take us through their deliberations, their fears and how they made their tough decisions. >> at 11:00 a.m. on may 1, 2011, two black hawk helicopters, 23 naycy sales, a translator and a dog named cairo took off from afghanistan. the mission -- to kill the world's most wanted made, osama bin laden. >> the death of bin laden marks the
, the union wouldn't have stayed. fdr is told somehow the japanese-americans are going to be coming in from california to detroit to take over the country. but as thurgood marshall, the supreme court justice, once said, those are precisely the moments when civil liberties matter most and when you have to be careful. and all those presidents suffer in history. eleanor roosevelt said about the incarceration of the japanese-americans, and fdr's failure to bring more jewish refugees into the country before hitler closed the door forever, those were his scars. she knew that. i think lincoln if he came back now would know his scar was that he wished he didn't have to do the habeas corpus. war takes -- it grows on itself and you do everything you need to. it's a sad, dark chapter. >> and the human element, jefferson used this when he talked about buying louisiana, which was unconstitutional, and he was -- >> detail. >> he was for the constitutional amendment before he was against it. he was going to amend the constitution to buy the louisiana purchase. then he got a letter saying napoleon was reth
these states are smaller states, more rural states. states in which public employee unions have less leverage in the politics which makes a big difference. and i think where the infrastructure needs are nowhere near as great as they are in the states that have central cities which require massive public transportation. mechanisms. the fact that those analogies aren't there doesn't diminish in any way the quite prudent and proper steps that these states have taken to keep their own fiscal house in order. certainly having rainy day funds which many of the big northern states haven't had is absolutely critical to take care of the enormous variations that occur in budgets, in the economy. i think you can't lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons you have smaller medicaid expenditure is because of the federal formula. which favors some states because it isn't based on the actual need. it's based on a median income calculation. and as a result of that, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think
go right over here not very far from here at union station and get on am trafnlgt it's not apparent why this fund something deemed "emergency spending" and including in this emergency package. further mitigation should be debated next year. amtrak loses billions of dollars every year. that's because we subsidize unneeded and unnecessary routes. the route on the east coast from here to new york, for example, makes money, but we cling to those routes that neither make money nor does anybody care to patronize. $5.3 billion for the army corps of engineers. more than the army corps of engineers' annual budget. d $ $5.3 billion, more than ther annual budget. included in the senate bill is $50 million in funding for more studies which will most definitely lead to additional army corps projects. and a new task force established by executive order. more projects are not something the army corps can handle. they're currently experiencing a backlog of projects of approximately $70 billion. furthermore, a 2010 report released by the government accountability office noted that carryover funds ha
union. but russian officials have pointed to the cases of 19 children who died after being adopted by americans. and in 2010, russia erupted in fury after a 7-year-old boy was sent back to russia alone by his american adoptive mother, carrying a note saying he had become too difficult to handle. but children's rights advocates say this new ban is playing politics with the lives of children. now, with no way of contacting her, she wishes she could send her daughter a simple message. >> i would tell her that we love her and to be strong and we're going to do everything we can to come back and get her. >> reporter: at the end of the last visit, it was paulina trying to comfort her mother. >> i was crying and telling her good-bye and she said, don't cry, mommy, be sfraung. >> reporter: this is the scene playing out in so many homes across america. families that soon thought they would be welcoming home a child and now wondering if they'll ever get to see that child, again. abc news, moscow. >> i have a confession to make. i've been to moscow and i've been to some orphanages in moscow.
of california and texas into the american union. mexico refuses to surrender despite the fact trees of both taylor and carney. the poked pope is jesus and winfield scott to invade central mexico. he bombards veracruz and travels through central mexico securing the capital of the fall of 1847. now in the eyes of americans, it was sort of a foregone conclusion that there sideway because most u.s. citizens harbored a host of racist police of mexican men. foremost among them being mexican men were too lazy and cowardly to fight. in point of fact, mexican troops but very hard as you can see in this print, mexico produces few images of the were so it's great when you find them so you can get a sense of how their envisioning this happening. mexico lost all of these battles and ultimately lost the military side of the war because they had vastly inferior weapons. their leadership was terrible. mexico's government was in turmoil. they were broke. there were various battles for no money was even making it to the army to support his titles. because hostile, native american tribes in the north of mexic
and negotiations between the longshoremen longshoremen's union and shipping companies are at an impasse. at issue here is pay for those working at the ports, but if the issue isn't resolved the consequences could be a devastating impact on the economy. as the rest of the country focuses on the political gridlock in washington workers at the port of houston are working overtime trying to get as many shipments in and out as they can before a threatened strike brings the port to a standstill. >> sitting here right now we fully expect there will be some shutdown or strike at the end of the day. >> reporter: jon gold vice president of the national retail federation says a shutdown at the docks would have a ripple effect on the global economy. >> the ports are a primary piece of the puzzle when it comes to the global supply chain. if they're not operating as efficiently as possible it slows down the entire system and hurts the productivity of all of the users of the system. >> reporter: negotiations between the international longshoreman's union and the shipping compani
and humanitarian needs. we support the efforts of the interim government of mali and the african union, united nations, to prepare a military response in accordance with international law to address the threats of terrorist and extremists in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed we think to a change in some of the northern groups as witnessed by the recent willingness of mnla and other members to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept propose and endorsed by the african union provides a foundation for planning a proposed military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well resourced, and appropriate. these issues include among other things the required force levels, the cost and funding needs, the logistical requirements, the operational timeliness, the protection of civilians, and ensuring that the proposed military action is adequately linked to a political strategy and an end state for military operations in the north. we have s
, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" from washington. america" from washington. the authority
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
through poland and the soviet union in the summer of 1985, the summer before their senior year. and on the first day in now st. petersburg, mark, always his father's son, asked if we could sell their great daily mass during our travels. this, we arranged and for me the happiness and praying daily in the soviet union with the gifted students was one of the brightest parts of our journey. mark went on to write a senior thesis on lyndon johnson's war on poverty. his list of achievements and onerous since graduation is impressive. from 1988 to 1995, marks served as the founder and director of the trace program, an intensive community-based counseling and advocacy program for status offenders, delinquents, abused and neglected youth in maryland the set forth the house of delegates where among other duties she chaired the joint committee on children, youth and families. following an unsuccessful campaign for congress in 2002, mark had served as the vice president and managing director of u.s. programs for save the children. he also chairs the national commission on children and disas
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